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Treating Your Facial Redness Based On Its Cause

Introduction

Redness in the face is one of the most puzzling skin-related concerns. You might be familiar with instances where you wake up with a few random red patches on your face and start to freak out. Maybe it’s from the extra cocktail you had last night, or maybe you just need to wash your face. But the redness doesn’t dissipate after a few hours and you start to panic and turn to Dr. Google. “Why is my face red?” “How do I get rid of redness in my face?” But Google gives a pretty unhelpful list that suggests you might potentially have a rare genetic skin disorder or skin cancer.

Facial redness can be pretty tricky to deal with. Some people experience bouts of itchy redness every few months only to find out they have actually been suffering from a mild case of rosacea all their life. Other people find out they are actually photosensitive, ultra-sensitive to the sun’s UV rays, and every time they go out under the sun their skin gets red and irritated. Others might realize that the new cleanser they just bought and were so excited to use is actually the culprit behind causing irritation to their skin. You might be allergic to something as simple as the car exhaust of your neighbor’s car and walking past it on the way to the subway is causing your skin to flare up in red, itchy patches.

The point is, there are so many reasons why your face is turning red! Redness basically occurs when the blood vessels in the face dilate, causing a greater volume of blood to rush into your face hence resulting in the redness. In this article, we will list out the possible causes of redness and give you some dermatologist-approved tips to calming and treating the pesky redness!

Rosacea

Rosacea is a condition in which the skin becomes overly sensitive and extra reactive to irritants in the environment. These irritants and triggers can include temperature changes, stress, spice, and alcohol.

There are a few ways that rosacea can show up on the skin. One type is a chronic red flush that is flat. This is called erythematotelangiectatic rosacea. The other type of rosacea is called papulopustular rosacea and it develops as red or pink bumps that are pus-filled and resemble very large pimples. Papulopustular rosacea is easier to identify because of the bumps and unevenness in the skin, but erythematotelangiectatic rosacea might be harder to detect because it just resembles a flush. If you have a mild case of it you might not even consider rosacea. If it keeps occurring you will probably want to get a dermatologists’ opinion on it.

Treating it

There isn’t a one-fix cure for rosacea because it is triggered by the environment. You will likely need a prescription as rosacea can flare up every few months. Usually, a dermatologist will prescribe a mix of antibiotics and topical creams, but this can vary depending on the severity of your rosacea. To prevent the redness at home, you will want to strengthen your skin barrier by using only gentle cleansers and very calming moisturizers. Don’t use any kind of exfoliators, chemical or otherwise. Look for makeup products that give redness-relief such as primers with a green tint to counteract the redness.

Milani Green Goddess Sleeping Mask + Primer

Get your beauty sleep with this mask and primer that calms, nourishes and deeply hydrates your skin overnight so that it is ready for any makeup in the morning.

$31.00

Wet n Wild Prime Focus Glass Correct Primer

This color-correcting primer will give you a crystal-like, glowy finish. Not to mention that it is infused with skin-loving Spirulina and Vitamin C for nourishment.

$5.99


Over exfoliation

They always say too much of a good thing can be a bad thing and that is certainly the case with exfoliation! Exfoliation is great for sloughing off the excess layers of dead skin that have built up on our skin, but too much exfoliating can certainly cause irritation and redness. Exfoliating can in fact be too harsh and damaging for your skin if you have any sort of sensitivity or have skin that is currently dry or dehydrated. Exfoliating a weak skin barrier can exacerbate the already damaged skin barrier and trigger inflammation and irritation. The more damaged the skin barrier is, the more susceptible the skin is to irritants and pollutants which can lead to inflammation and redness.

Treating it

It’s a painful goodbye, but you will have put your exfoliants aside — no more alpha-hydroxy acids, no more chemical peel pads, no more grainy exfoliators. Instead, swap them out for skin barrier-strengthening products that will impart tons of moisture into your skin! Hyaluronic acid is a particularly good ingredient for really pumping tons of water into the skin.

Dr. Barbara Sturm Hyaluronic Serum

With an optimal concentration of low and high-weighted Hyaluronic molecules, this serum provides instant hydration and will give your skin an enhanced radiance.

$309.00




Contact dermatitis

Contact dermatitis is the medical term for an allergic reaction to contact with a substance. It could be anything, from a plant to animals or even ingredients in your skincare products. Perhaps your immune system is actually allergic to the ingredient and is producing inflammation in reaction to the irritant. Or perhaps the ingredient itself is irritating the skin and causing redness. You might be allergic to anything from lactic acid to a particular essential oil in your serum. Common triggers are fragrances and sulfates in foaming cleansers.

How to treat it

Contact dermatitis can be hard to spot, and if you are unsure if it is contact dermatitis or eczema, consult a dermatologist. Usually, you can treat it using over-the-counter 1% hydrocortisone creams which are very effective at reducing redness. However, if it does not improve you should seek medical advice or stronger medical-grade prescriptive creams. A dermatologist can also do some tests to determine what is causing your allergy.


Acne

Acne could also be the cause of your redness! Acne-induced redness would occur if you are suffering from more severe forms of it such as pustules and papules. Some cases can result in the skin becoming uneven, bumpy, or even thicker in certain areas.

How to treat it

If you are suffering from a bout of inflammation due to acne, the best thing is to target the pimples before they get bigger. Some of the best acne-fighting ingredients are salicylic acid to dry out the oil in the pimple, glycolic acid to get rid of excess gunk and dead skin cell buildup, and retinoids to speed up the skin cell turnover. If your pimple is particularly stubborn or likely to scar, you can get laser treatments or cortisone shots at the dermatologist to quickly get rid of the pimple.

Peter Thomas Roth PRO Strength 10% PHA Exfoliating Clarifying Liquid

Packed with a concentration of 10% Glucanolactone Polyhydroxy Acid (PHA), 5% Glycolic Acid (AHA) and 0.5 Salicylic Acid (BHA), it is effective in reducing acne.

$58.00

Salameh Acne Repair Pads

Formulated with 2% Salicylic Acid, 5% Glycolic Acid, and 5% Lactic Acid, this gentle, microchemical peel exfoliates and corrects present and future acne issues.

$89.00



Conclusion

There are many things that cause redness, so finding out what is the cause of yours is crucial to effectively reduce and treat it!

Recommended Products

No. ProductPriceBuy
1Milani Green Goddess Sleeping Mask + Primer

Get your beauty sleep with this mask and primer that calms, nourishes and deeply hydrates your skin overnight so that it is makeup-ready.
$31Shop
2Wet n Wild Prime Focus Glass Correct Primer

This color-correcting primer will give you a crystal-like, glowy finish. Not to mention that it is infused with skin-loving Spirulina.
$5.99Shop
3Dr. Barbara Sturm Hyaluronic Serum

With an optimal concentration of low and high weighted Hyaluronic molecules, this serum provides instant hydration.
$309Shop
4Peter Thomas Roth PRO Strength 10% PHA Exfoliating Clarifying Liquid

Packed with a concentration of 10% PHA, 5% Glycolic Acid (AHA) and 0.5 Salicylic Acid (BHA), it is effective in reducing acne.
$58Shop
5Salameh Acne Repair Pads

Formulated with 2% Salicylic Acid and 5% Lactic Acid, this gentle, microchemical peel exfoliates and corrects acne issues.
$89Shop

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